Salvia divinorum

Salvia, salvinorins and salvanorin derivatives

 

 

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Siebert (1994). Salvia divinorum and salvinorin A: new pharmacologic findings. Journal of Ethnopharmacology.

Valdés (1994). Salvia divinorum and the unique diterpene hallucinogen, salvinorin (divinorin) A. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

Giroud et al. (2000). Salvia divinorum: an hallucinogenic mint which might become a new recreational drug in Switzerland. Forensic Science International.

Hanes (2001). Antidepressant effects of the herb saliva divinorum: A case report. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology.

Valdés et al. (2001). Salvinorin C, a new neoclerodane diterpene from a bioactive fraction of the hallucinogenic Mexican mint Salvia divinorum. Organic Letters.

Roth et al. (2002). Salvinorin A: a potent naturally occurring nonnitrogenous kappa opioid selective agonist.

Bigham et al. (2003). Divinatorins A-C, new neoclerodane diterpenoids from the controlled sage Salvia divinorum. Journal of Natural Products.

Munro & Rizzacasa (2003). Salvinorins D-F, new neoclerodane diterpenoids from Salvia divinorum, and an improved method for the isolation of salvinorin A. Journal of Natural Products.

Butelman, Harris & Kreek (2004). The plant-derived hallucinogen, salvinorin A, produces κ-opioid agonist-like discriminative effects in rhesus monkeys. Psychopharmacology.

Chavkin et al. (2004). Salvinorin A, an active component of the hallucinogenic sage salvia divinorum is a highly efficacious kappa-opioid receptor agonist: structural and functional considerations. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

Siebert (2004). Localization of salvinorin A and related compounds in glandular trichomes of the psychoactive sage, Salvia divinorum. Annals of Botany.

Tidgewell et al. (2004). A facile method for the preparation of deuterium labeled salvinorin A: synthesis of [2,2,2-2H3]-salvinorin A. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Bücheler et al. (2005). Use of nonprohibited hallucinogenic plants: increasing relevance for public health? a case report and literature review on the consumption of salvia. Pharmacopsychiatry.

Fantegrossi (2005). Kappa-opioid receptor-mediated effects of the plant-derived hallucinogen, salvinorin A, on inverted screen performance in the mouse. Behavioural Pharmacology.

Pichini et al. (2005). Quantification of the plant-derived hallucinogen Salvinorin A in conventional and non-conventional biological fluids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after Salvia divinorum smoking. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry.

Prisizano (2005). Psychopharmacology of the hallucinogenic sage Salvia divinorum. Life Sciences.

Harding et al. (2005). Neoclerodane diterpenes as a novel scaffold for mu opioid receptor ligands. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Harding et al. (2005). Salvinicins A and B, new neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum.

Lee et al. (2005). New neoclerodane diterpenoids isolated from the leaves of Salvia divinorum and their binding affinities for human kappa opioid receptors. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry.

Munro et al. (2005). Studies toward the pharmacophore of salvinorin A, a potent kappa opioid receptor agonist. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Schmidt et al. (2005). Pharmacokinetics of the plant-derived kappa-opioid hallucinogen salvinorin A in nonhuman primates. Synapse.

Zhang et al. (2005). Effects of the plant-derived hallucinogen salvinorin A on basal dopamine levels in the caudate putamen and in a conditioned place aversion assay in mice: Agonist actions at kappa opioid receptors. Psychopharmacology.

Ansonoff et al. (2006). Antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of salvinorin a are abolished in a novel strain of κ-opioid receptor-1 knockout mice. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

Bertea et al. (2006). PCR and PCR-RFLP of the 5S-rRNA-NTS region and salvinorin A analyses for the rapid and unequivocal determination of Salvia divinorum. Phytochemistry.

Capasso et al. (2006). The hallucinogenic herb Salvia divinorum and its active ingredient salvinorin A inhibit enteric cholinergic transmission in the guinea-pig ileum. Neurogastroenterology and Motility.

Carlezon et al. (2006). Depressive-like effects of the κ-opioid receptor agonist salvinorin a on behavior and neurochemistry in rats. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

González et al. (2006). Pattern of use and subjective effects of Salvia divinorum among recreational users. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Harding (2006). Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: selective modification of the furan ring. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Harding et al. (2006). Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: semisynthesis of salvinicins A and B and other chemical transformations of salvinorin A. Journal of Natural Products.

Imanshahidi & Hosseinzadeh (2006). The pharmacological effects of Salvia species on the central nervous system. Phytotherapy Research.

John, French & Erlichman (2006). The antinociceptive effect of salvinorin A in mice. European Journal of Pharmacology.

Lee et al. (2006). Synthesis and in vitro pharmacological studies of new C(4)-modified salvinorin A analogues. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Medana et al. (2006). Determination of salvinorins and divinatorins in Salvia divinorum leaves by liquid chromatography/multistage mass spectrometry. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry.

Shirota, Nagamatsu & Sekita (2006). Neo-clerodane diterpenes from the hallucinogenic sage Salvia divinorum. Journal of Natural Products.

Siemann et al. (2006). [Salvia divinorum--representation of a new drug in the Internet]. Gesundheitswesen.

Tidgewell (2006). Synthesis of salvinorin A analogues as opioid receptor probes. Journal of Natural Products.

Vortherms & Roth (2006). Salvinorin A: from natural product to human therapeutics. Molecular Interventions.

Wolowich, Perkins & Cienki (2006). Analysis of the psychoactive terpenoid salvinorin A content in five Salvia divinorum herbal products. Pharmacotherapy.

Appel & Kim-Appel (2007). The rise of a new psychoactive agent: Salvia divinorum. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction.

Braida et al. (2007). Hallucinatory and rewarding effect of salvinorin A in zebrafish: κ-opioid and CB₁-cannabinoid receptor involvement. Psychopharmacology.

Butelman et al. (2007). Effects of salvinorin a, a κ-opioid hallucinogen, on a neuroendocrine biomarker assay in nonhuman primates with high κ-receptor homology to humans. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutic.

Dalgarno (2007). Subjective effects of Salvia divinorum? Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

Grundmann et al. (2007). Salvia divinorum and salvinorin A: an update on pharmacology and analytical methodology. Planta Medica.

Holden et al. (2007). Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: exploration of the 1-position. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Kutrzeba et al. (2007). Biosynthesis of salvinorin A proceeds via the deoxyxylulose phosphate pathway. Phytochemistry.

Li et al. (2007). Isolation and chemical modification of clerodane diterpenoids from Salvia species as potential agonists at the kappa-opioid receptor. Chemistry & Biodiversity.

Luciano et al. (2007). DNA internal standard for the quantitative determination of hallucinogenic plants in plant mixtures. Forensic Science International: Genetics.

Simpson et al. (2007). Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: preparation and opioid receptor activity of salvinicin analogues. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Singh (2007). Adolescent salvia substance abuse. Addiction.

Vortherms et al. (2007). Differential helical orientations among related G protein-coupled receptors provide a novel mechanism for selectivity. Studies with salvinorin A and the kappa-opioid receptor. The Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Willmore-Fordham et al. (2007). The hallucinogen derived from Salvia divinorum, salvinorin a, has κ-opioid agonist discriminative stimulus effects in rats. Neuropharmacology.

Babu, McCurdy & Boyer (2008). Opioid receptors and legal highs: Salvia divinorum and Kratom. Clinical Toxicology.

Beerepoot et al. (2008). Effects of salvinorin A on locomotor sensitization to D2/D3 dopamine agonist quinpirole. Neuroscience Letters.

Braida et al. (2008). Involvement of κ-opioid and endocannabinoid system on Salvinorin A-induced reward. Biological Psychiatry.

Capasso et al. (2008). Inhibitory effect of salvinorin A, from Salvia divinorum, on ileitis-induced hypermotility: cross-talk between kappa-opioid and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. British Journal of Pharmacology.

Capasso et al. (2008). The hallucinogenic herb Salvia divinorum and its active ingredient salvinorin A reduce inflammation-induced hypermotility in mice. Neurogastroenterology and Motility.

Griffin, Miller & Khey (2008). Legally high? Legal considerations of Salvia divinorum. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

Hooker et al. (2008). Pharmacokinetics of the potent hallucinogen, salvinorin A in primates parallels the rapid onset and short duration of effects in humans. NeuroImage.

Hoover et al. (2008). Internet access to Salvia divinorum: Implications for policy, prevention, and treatment. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment.

Kempf et al. (2008). Identification of sinicuichi alkaloids in human serum after intoxication caused by oral intake of a Heimia salicifolia extract. Forensic Science International.

Khey, Miller & Griffin (2008). Salvia divinorum use among a college student sample. Journal of Drug Education.

Kikura-Hanajiri (2008). [Analytical data of designated substances (Shitei-Yakubutsu) controlled by the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law in Japan, part I: GC-MS and LC-MS]. Yakugaku Zasshi.

Lange et al. (2008). College student use of Salvia divinorum. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Maruyama et al. (2008). [Authentication and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS analysis of magic mint, Salvia divinorum and its related plants]. Yakugaku Zasshi.

McDonough et al. (2008). The detection and quantitative analysis of the psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum, salvinorin A, in human biological fluids using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Journal of Analytical Toxicology.

Tsujikawa et al. (2008). Determination of salvinorin A and salvinorin B in Salvia divinorum-related products circulated in Japan. Forensic Science International.

Albertson & Grubbs (2009). Subjective effects of Salvia divinorum: LSD- or marijuana-like? Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

Baker et al. (2009). Comparison of the discriminative stimulus effects of salvinorin A and its derivatives to U69,593 and U50,488 in rats. Psychopharmacology.

Braida (2009). Potential anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of salvinorin A, the main active ingredient of Salvia divinorum, in rodents. British Journal of Pharmacology.

Butelman et al. (2009). Unconditioned behavioral effects of the powerful k-opioid hallucinogen Salvinorin A in nonhuman primates: Fast onset and entry into cerebrospinal fluid. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

Fichna et al. (2009). Salvinorin A inhibits colonic transit and neurogenic ion transport in mice by activating kappa-opioid and cannabinoid receptors. Neurogastroenterology and Motility.

Fichna et al. (2009). Selective natural kappa opioid and cannabinoid receptor agonists with a potential role in the treatment of gastrointestinal dysfunction. Drug News & Perspectives.

Fontana et al. (2009). Synthetic studies on neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia splendens: oxidative modifications of ring A. Tetrahedron.

Jermain & Evans (2009). Analyzing salvia divinorum and its active ingredient salvinorin a utilizing thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Journal of Forensic Sciences.

Kutrzeba, Ferreira & Zjawiony (2009). Salvinorins J from Salvia divinorum: mutarotation in the neoclerodane system. Journal of Natural Products.

Miller et al. (2009). Trippin' on Sally D: Exploring predictors of Salvia divinorum experimentation. Journal of Criminal Justice.

Morani et al. (2009). Effect of kappa-opioid receptor agonists U69593, U50488H, spiradoline and salvinorin A on cocaine-induced drug-seeking in rats. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior.

Przekop & Lee (2009). Persistent psychosis associated with Salvia divinorum use. The American Journal of Psychiatry.

Simpson et al. (2009). Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: role of the furan in affinity for opioid receptors. Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry.

Teksin et al. (2009). Evaluation of the transport, in vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetics of Salvinorin A, a potent hallucinogen. European Journal of Pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics.

Tsujikawa et al. (2009). In vitro stability and metabolism of salvinorin A in rat plasma. Xenobiotica.

Yang et al. (2009). Synthesis and biological evaluation of C-12 triazole and oxadiazole analogs of salvinorin A. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Baggott et al. (2010). Use patterns and self-reported effects of salvia divinorum: An internet-based survey. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Breton et al. (2010). Prolonged hallucinations and dissociative self mutilation following use of Salvia divinorum in a bipolar adolescent girl. Journal of Substance Use.

Hanson (2010). Natural products from the hallucinogenic sage. Science Progress.

Kennedy & Wiseman. Direct analysis of Salvia divinorum leaves for salvinorin A by thin layer chromatography and desorption electrospray ionization multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry.

Killinger, Peet & Baker (2010). Salvinorin A fails to substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of LSD or ketamine in Sprague–Dawley rats. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior.

Kutrzeba et al. (2010). Intramolecular transacetylation in salvinorins D and E. Journal of Natural Products.

Lange et al. (2010). Salvia divinorum: Effects and use among Youtube users. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Lee et al. (2010). Synthesis and biological evaluation of C-2 halogenated analogs of salvinorin A. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Nyi et al. (2010). Influence of age on Salvia divinorum use: Results of an Internet survey. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

Phipps & Butterweck (2010). A new digitized method of the compulsive gnawing test revealed dopaminergic activity of salvinorin A in vivo. Planta Medica.

Walentiny et al. (2010). Kappa opioid mediation of cannabinoid effects of the potent hallucinogen, salvinorin A, in rodents. Psychopharmacology.

Ahern & Greenberg (2011). Psychoactive herb use and youth: a closer look at Salvia divinorum. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services.

Aviello et al. (2011). Ultrapotent effects of salvinorin A, a hallucinogenic compound from Salvia divinorum, on LPS-stimulated murine macrophages and its anti-inflammatory action in vivo.

Braida et al. (2011). Learning and memory impairment induced by salvinorin A, the principal ingredient of Salvia divinorum, in wistar rats. International Journal of Toxicology.

Casselman & Heinrich (2011). Novel use patterns of Salvia divinorum: unobtrusive observation using YouTube™. Journal of Ethnopharmacology.

Cunningham, Rothman & Prisinzano (2011). Neuropharmacology of the naturally occurring kappa-opioid hallucinogen salvinorin A. Pharmacological Reviews.

Fichna et al. (2011). Differential effects of salvinorin A on endotoxin-induced hypermotility and neurogenic ion transport in mouse ileum. Neurogastroenterology and Motility.

Ford, Watkins & Blumenstein (2011). Correlates of Salvia divinorum use in a national sample: findings from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Addictive Behaviors.

Jenks, Walker & Kim (2011). Evolution and origins of the Mazatec hallucinogenic sage, Salvia divinorum (Lamiaceae): a molecular phylogenetic approach. Journal of Plant Research.

Johnson et al. (2011). Human psychopharmacology and dose-effects of salvinorin A, a kappa opioid agonist hallucinogen present in the plant Salvia divinorum. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Kelly (2011). Legally tripping: a qualitative profile of Salvia divinorum use among young adults. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

Listos, Merska & Fidecka (2011). Pharmacological activity of salvinorin A, the major component of Salvia divinorum. Pharmacological Reports.

Mendelson et al. (2011). Lack of effect of sublingual salvinorin A, a naturally occurring kappa opioid, in humans: a placebo-controlled trial. Psychopharmacology.

Peet & Baker (2011). Salvinorin B derivatives, EOM-Sal B and MOM-Sal B, produce stimulus generalization in male Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate salvinorin A. Behavioural Pharmacology.

Wu et al. (2011). Recent national trends in Salvia divinorum use and substance-use disorders among recent and former Salvia divinorum users compared with nonusers. Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation.

Schmidt et al. (2011). "Legal highs" on the net-Evaluation of UK-based Websites, products and product information. Forensic Science International.

Sumnall et al. (2011). Salvia divinorum use and phenomenology: results from an online survey. Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Vohra et al. (2011). Salvia divinorum: exposures reported to a statewide poison control system over 10 years. The Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Addy (2012). Acute and post-acute behavioral and psychological effects of salvinorin A in humans. Psychopharmacology.

Barnes & Snow (2012). Analysis of Salvinorin A in plants, water, and urine using solid-phase microextraction-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. Journal of Chromatography.

Butelman et al. (2012). Behavioral effects and central nervous system levels of the broadly available κ-agonist hallucinogen salvinorin A are affected by P-glycoprotein modulation in vivo. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

Guida et al. (2012). Salvinorin A reduces mechanical allodynia and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability induced by peripheral formalin injection. Molecular Pain.

Harden et al. (2012). Antidepressive effects of the κ-opioid receptor agonist salvinorin A in a rat model of anhedonia. Behavioural Pharmacology.

Lovell et al. (2012). Semisynthetic neoclerodanes as kappa opioid receptor probes. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry.

Meyer & Writer (2012). Salvia divinorum. Psychosomatics.

Perron et al. (2012). Use of Salvia divinorum in a nationally representative sample. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.

Piekielna, Fichna & Janecka (2012). [Salvinorin A and related diterpenes--biological activity and potential therapeutic uses]. Postepy Biochemii.

Ranganathan et al. (2012). Dose-related behavioral, subjective, endocrine, and psychophysiological effects of the κ opioid agonist Salvinorin A in humans. Biological Psychiatry.

Stogner et al. (2012). Regulating a novel drug: an evaluation of changes in use of Salvia divinorum in the first year of Florida's ban. The International Journal on Drug Policy.

Travis, Ray & Marlowe (2012). A report of nausea and vomiting with discontinuation of chronic use of salvia divinorum. Case Reports in Medicine.

Willard, McGuffin & Smith (2012). Forensic analysis of Salvia divinorum using multivariate statistical procedures. Part I: discrimination from related Salvia species. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.

Willard, McGuffin & Smith (2012). Forensic analysis of Salvia divinorum using multivariate statistical procedures. Part II: association of adulterated samples to S. divinorum. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.

Currie (2013). Epidemiology of adolescent Salvia divinorum use in Canada. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Diaz (2013). Salvia divinorum: a psychopharmacological riddle and a mind-body prospect. Current Drug Abuse Reviews

Dueweke (2013). Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 3: what are the clinical features of Salvia divinorum toxicity? Emergency Medicine Journal.

Kowalczuk et al. (2013). Vegetative anatomy and micromorphology of Salvia divinorum (Lamiaceae) from Mexico, combined with chromatographic analysis of salvinorin A. Journal of Natural Medicines.

MacLean et al. (2013). Dose-related effects of salvinorin A in humans: dissociative, hallucinogenic, and memory effects. Psychopharmacology.

Miller, Boman & Stogner (2013). Examining the measurement of novel drug perceptions: Salvia divinorum, gender, and peer substance use. Substance Use & Misuse.

Murphy & Bola (2013). DNA identification of Salvia divinorum samples. Forensic Science International: Genetics.

Paudel et al. (2013). Development of an enzyme immunoassay using a monoclonal antibody against the psychoactive diterpenoid salvinorin A. Journal of Natural Products.

Polepally et al. (2013). Kappa-opioid receptor-selective dicarboxylic ester-derived salvinorin A ligands. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Prisinzano (2013). Neoclerodanes as atypical opioid receptor ligands. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Riley et al. (2013). Palladium-catalyzed transformations of salvinorin A, a neoclerodane diterpene from Salvia divinorum. Organic Letters.

Sanders, Stogner & Miller (2013).  Perception vs. reality: an investigation of the misperceptions concerning the extent of peer novel drug use. Journal of Drug Education.

Zawilska & Wojcieszak (2013). Salvia divinorum: from Mazatec medicinal and hallucinogenic plant to emerging recreational drug. Human Psychopharmacology.

Casselman et al. (2014). From local to global-fifty years of research on Salvia divinorum. Journal of Ethnopharmacology.

dos Santos et al. (2014). Salvinorin a and related compounds as therapeutic drugs for psychostimulant-related disorders. Current Drug Abuse Reviews.

Gutierrez & Cooper (2014). Investigating correlates of synthetic marijuana and Salvia use in light and intermittent smokers and college students in a predominantly Hispanic sample. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.

Hamidpour et al. (2014). Chemistry, pharmacology, and medicinal property of sage (salvia) to prevent and cure illnesses such as obesity, diabetes, depression, dementia, lupus, autism, heart disease, and cancer. Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine.

Kivell, Ewald & Prisinzano (2014). Salvinorin A analogs and other κ-opioid receptor compounds as treatments for cocaine abuse. Advances in Pharmacology.

Krstenansky & Muzzio (2014). Analysis of the smoke of cigarettes containing Salvia divinorum. Journal of Analytical Toxicology.

Lin et al. (2014). Quantitative determination of salvinorin A, a natural hallucinogen with abuse liability, in Internet-available Salvia divinorum and endemic species of Salvia in Taiwan. Journal of Food and Drug Analysis.

Polepally et al. (2014). Michael acceptor approach to the design of new salvinorin A-based high affinity ligands for the kappa-opioid receptor. European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Riley et al. (2014). Synthesis and κ-opioid receptor activity of furan-substituted salvinorin A analogues. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Stiefel, Merrifield & Holcombe (2014). The claustrum's proposed role in consciousness is supported by the effect and target localization of Salvia divinorum. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience.

Sufka et al. (2014). The effect of Salvia divinorum and Mitragyna speciosa extracts, fraction and major constituents on place aversion and place preference in rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology.

Winslow & Mahendran (2014). From divination to madness: features of acute intoxication with Salvia use. Singapore Medical Journal.

Xavier et al. (2014). Analytical investigation of legal high products containing Salvia divinorum traded in smartshops and internet. Forensic Science International.

Sami (2015). Psychosis, psychedelic substance misuse and head injury: A case report and 23 year follow-up. Brain Injury.

Serra et al. (2015). Behavioural and neurochemical assessment of salvinorin A abuse potential in the rat. Psychopharmacology.

Simonson et al. (2015). Pharmacology and anti-addiction effects of the novel κ opioid receptor agonist Mesyl Sal B, a potent and long-acting analogue of salvinorin A. British Journal of Pharmacology.

Addy et al. (2015). The subjective experience of acute, experimentally-induced Salvia divinorum inebriation. Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Butelman & Kreek (2015). Salvinorin A, a kappa-opioid receptor agonist hallucinogen: pharmacology and potential template for novel pharmacotherapeutic agents in neuropsychiatric disorders. Frontiers in Pharmacology.

Butelman & Kreek (2015). Corrigendum: Salvinorin A, a kappa-opioid receptor agonist hallucinogen: pharmacology and potential template for novel pharmacotherapeutic agents in neuropsychiatric disorders. Frontiers in Pharmacology.

El-Khoury & Sahakian (2015). The association of Salvia divinorum and psychotic disorders: a review of the literature and case series. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

Hernández-Bello et al. (2015). Salvinorin A content in legal high products of Salvia divinorum sold in Mexico.

Maqueda et al. (2015). Salvinorin-A induces intense dissociative effects, blocking external sensory perception and modulating interoception and sense of body ownership in humans. The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Crowley et al. (2016). Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from salvia divinorum: identification of a potent and centrally acting μ opioid analgesic with reduced abuse liability. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

González-Trujano et al. (2016). Depressant effects of salvia divinorum involve disruption of physiological sleep. Phytotherapy Research.

Hutton, Kivell & Boyle (2016). "Quite a Profoundly Strange Experience": An Analysis of the Experiences of Salvia divinorum Users. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

Johnson et al. (2016). Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans. Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Li, Morris-Natschke & Lee (2016). Clerodane diterpenes: sources, structures, and biological activities. Natural Products Reports.

Mahendran et al. (2016). Salvia divinorum: An overview of the usage, misuse, and addiction processes. Asia-Pacific Psychiatry.

Maqueda et al. (2016). Naltrexone but not ketanserin antagonizes the subjective, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine effects of salvinorin-a in humans. The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Margalho et al. (2016). Salvia divinorum: toxicological aspects and analysis in human biological specimens. Bioanalysis.

Martinho, Silva & Gallardo (2016). Cytotoxic effects of salvinorin a, a major constituent of salvia divinorum. Medical Chemistry.

Rossi et al. (2016). The hallucinogenic diterpene salvinorin A inhibits leukotriene synthesis in experimental models of inflammation. Pharmacological Research.

Xu et al. (2016). Chemogenomics knowledgebase and systems pharmacology for hallucinogen target identification-Salvinorin A as a case study. Journal of Molecular Graphics & Modelling.

Chen et al. (2017). A (-)-kolavenyl diphosphate synthase catalyzes the first step of salvinorin A biosynthesis in Salvia divinorum. Journal of Experimental Botany.

Cruz et al. (2017). A unique natural selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist, salvinorin A, and its roles in human therapeutics. Phytochemistry.

Hatipoglu et al. (2017). Screening of hallucinogenic compounds and genomic characterisation of 40 anatolian salvia species. Phytochemical Analysis.

Paudel et al. (2017). An immunochromatographic assay for rapid etection of salvinorin A. Journal of Immunoassay & immunochemistry.

Pelot et al. (2017). Biosynthesis of the psychotropic plant diterpene salvinorin A: Discovery and characterization of the Salvia divinorum clerodienyl diphosphate synthase. The Plant Journal.

Rossi et al. (2017). Salvinorin A inhibits airway hyperreactivity induced by ovalbumin sensitization. Frontiers in Pharmacology.

Simón-Arceo (2017). Neuropathic and inflammatory antinociceptive effects and electrocortical changes produced by Salvia divinorum in rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology.

Coffeen et al. (2018). Salvinorin A reduces neuropathic nociception in the insular cortex of the rat. European Journal of Pain.

El-Khoury & Baroud (2018). Case series: Salvia divinorum as a potential addictive hallucinogen. The American Journal of Addiction.